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Learning Differences: LD Basics

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Facts about LDs

  • Fifteen percent of the U.S. population, or one in seven Americans, has some type of learning disability, according to the National Institutes of Health.
  • Difficulty with basic reading and language skills are the most common learning disabilities. As many as 80% of students with learning disabilities have reading problems.
  • Learning disabilities often run in families.
  • Learning disabilities should not be confused with other disabilities such as mental retardation, autism, deafness, blindness, and behavioral disorders. None of these conditions are learning disabilities. In addition, they should not be confused with lack of educational opportunities like frequent changes of schools or attendance problems. Also, children who are learning English do not necessarily have a learning disability.

Stephen J. Cannell talks

Stephen J. Cannell (acclaimed television writer and producer) has lived with dyslexia his entire life. In this inspiring video series, he explains dyslexia, misconceptions, challenges and ways to help children with dyslexia. In this video, Stephen has advice for parents regarding children with dyslexia.

LD Basics

"A learning disability is a neurological disorder that affects one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using spoken or written language. The disability may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell or to do mathematical calculations.

Every individual with a learning disability is unique and shows a different combination and degree of difficulties. A common characteristic among people with learning differences is uneven areas of ability, "a weakness within a sea of strengths." For instance, a child with dyslexia who struggles with reading, writing, and spelling may be very capable in math and science.

Learning disabilities should not be confused with learning problems which are primarily the result of visual, hearing, or motor handicaps; of mental retardation; of emotional disturbance; or of environental, cultural or economic disadvantages."

LDA: Learning Disabilities: Sign, Symptoms, and Strategies

Coudl This Be Teh Sercet To Sussecc?

Read the article "Could this be teh sercet to sussecc?" by Chris Warren, in American way (July 1, 2008), about how dyslexia might be an asset in the business world.

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This LibGuide was created by Kathy Fester

Concordian International School, Bangkok

The content is shared under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commerical license.