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Anti-Racism / Anti-Oppression: Anti-Racism / Anti-Oppression Home

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Welcome to our Anti-Racism / Anti-Oppression

Welcome to the Anti-Racism / Anti-Racism Guide

This guide is intended to provide some general information about anti-oppression, diversity, and inclusion as well as information and resources for the social justice issues.

The guide is by no means exhaustive, but rather serves as a starting place for finding information from a variety of sources. It will continue to develop in response to evolving anti-oppression issues and community needs.

 

Related Guide

JSTOR Daily: Black Lives Matter

Racism & Anti-Racism

Racism = Prejudice + Power

Anyone of any race can have/exhibit racial prejudice, but in North America, white people have the institutional power, therefore racism is a systematized discrimination or antagonism directed against people of color based on the belief that whiteness is superior.

Racism is insidious, systemic, devastating, and integral to understanding both the history of the United States and the everyday experiences of those of us living in this country.

Note: A common, incorrect definition of racism is the colloquial definition: “racism is prejudice against someone based on their skin color or ethnicity and can be committed by anyone.” This is NOT an accurate definition nor the one used in most anti-racist circles. It highlights individuals' thinking and actions but ignores embedded institutional and cultural systems. Non-white folks can be agents of racism as well (particularly when acting as representatives of white-dominated systems, such as higher education) by perpetuating the notion of white superiority and using it to discriminate against other people of color. For example, a black manager at a company may insist that a black employee's natural hair looks "unprofessional," or an Asian professor may knock points off the presentation grade of a Latinx student who speaks with an accent.

Anti-Racism strategies, theories, actions, and practices that challenge and counter racism, inequalities, prejudices, and discrimination based on race.

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This guide was created by Kathy Fester whi used and adapted resources with the permission of Lebanon Valley College Library.

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